Reviewers

Joel Adelberg
Joel Adelberg

Joel Adelberg is Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction for the Bedford Central School District, New York. He earned his Doctor of Education from Fordham University. Adelberg served as the principal of Fox Lane High School, in Bedford, NY, for seven years prior to assuming his current role. He is also a former principal of Croton-Harmon High School and a former assistant principal of Horace Greeley High School, both located in New York.

Victoria Antonini
Victoria Antonini

Victoria Antonini is the principal of Sunset Park High School in Brooklyn, NY. She has worked within the New York City Department of Education for over twenty years as a classroom teacher and as an assistant principal. She is dedicated to working towards realizing the goal of providing an accessible, inclusive and excellent education for all children.

Scott Bain
Scott Bain

Scott Bain currently the principal of Jefferson County Open School in Lakewood, Colorado. He has worked as a teacher, an advisor, an instructional coach, and a principal in several progressive schools throughout Colorado. Scott is an advocate for progressive education and has presented at numerous conferences including the Alternative Learning Network Conference, Alternative Education Resource Organization Conference, and International Democratic Education Conference. He has also been a consultant for numerous schools in the United States and internationally.

Josie Chang-Order
Josie Chang-Order

Josie Chang-Order is a doctoral candidate at the University of Colorado Boulder. She has taught in nonprofit organizations such as Crow Canyon Archaeological Center and the History Colorado Center. Her current research interests include informal education, public history career pathways, and gaming and learning.

Julia Daniel
Julia Daniel

Julia Daniel is a PhD student at the University of Colorado, Boulder. She is committed to community organizing, having worked in organizing Florida around issues of racial, gender and economic justice. Most of this work centered on ending the schoolhouse-to-jailhouse pipeline for Black and Latino students in Miami by working with impacted young people in demanding alternatives such as restorative justice. She holds an B.A. in Sociology from New College of Florida and an M.A. in Urban Education Policy from Brown University.

Mary de Leon-Denten
Mary de Leon-Denten

Mary J. de LeonDenton is a researcher and retired Speech/Language Pathologist with 36 years in the field. She earned her Doctor of Education from the University of Minnesota in Education Policy and Administration. She has served as an antiracism dialogue facilitator, Director of CareerTeacher – the St. Paul Federation of Teachers’ alternative licensure program, adjunct professor for St. Mary’s and Hamline Universities, an education research and dissemination trainer, and in numerous leadership positions for the St. Paul Federation of Teachers and Education Minnesota. Her continued work focuses on race, culture, equity, and privilege in public education. de Leon Denton’s previous work appears in Sexuality Matters: Paradigms and Policies for Educational Leaders (2009) and Educational Administration Quarterly (2012).

Kara Finnigan
Kara Finnigan

Kara Finnigan is associate professor of education policy at the University of Rochester. She has conducted research and evaluations of K12 educational policies and programs for more than 20 years through her work at the UR as well as prominent research organizations, including SRI International and the George Lucas Educational Foundation. She has written extensively about low-performing schools and highstakes accountability, district reform, principal leadership, and school choice. Finnigan's research blends perspectives in education, sociology, and political science; employs qualitative and quantitative methods, including social network analysis and GIS mapping; and focuses on urban school districts. Her current research focuses on the role of social networks in the acquisition, use, and diffusion of research evidence in education; school desegregation policies; and linkages between education, housing, health, and other policies to bring about regional equity.

Ryan Fink
Ryan Frink

Ryan Frink has served as the principal of Grand Valley High School in Parachute, CO since 2006. Ryan was a member of the Colorado Department of Education’s State Graduation Portfolio/Capstone Work Group where he helped to create graduation guidelines for the state of Colorado. He also serves on the Board for “I’m Third”, a nonprofit organization that focuses on eliminating barriers for students in need. He also cofounded the Grand Valley Givers whose main focus is providing holiday gifts to less fortunate children.

Kathy Gebhardt
Kathy Gebhardt

Kathy Gebhardt is the Executive Director of Children’s Voices, a nonprofit law firm, and Lift One Lift All, a network of public education supporters. She graduated from the University of Denver College of Law and Lewis and Clark College. Her advocacy focuses on working to ensure that all schoolage children in Colorado, regardless of their background and where they live, have the opportunity for an excellent education. Kathy was the one of the lead attorneys in several school finance cases filed in Colorado over the past 20 years. Kathy is an adjunct professor at the University of Denver, Sturm College of Law and a fellow with the National Education Policy Center. She also serves on numerous boards, including the Boulder Valley School District Board of Education; Colorado Lawyers Committee; BEST (Building Excellent Schools Today); and Great Education Colorado.

Joanna Goode
Joanna Goode

Joanna Goode is a professor of education studies at the University of Oregon and a former mathematics and computer science high school teacher. She completed her doctorate in urban schooling, her master’s degree in education, and her bachelor’s degree in applied mathematics and computing, all at UCLA. Her research examines how large scale reforms in computer science education can provide new opportunities and introduce new challenges to equity and inclusion in computing classrooms. Joanna is the lead designer of the national Exploring Computer Science curriculum and professional development program and coauthor of the book, Stuck in the Shallow End: Education, Race, and Computing (MIT Press, 2008).

Beverly Harper
Beverly Harper

Beverly Harper earned a Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership from the University of Georgia. Her research interests include how principals develop teacher leaders and the effect teacher mentors have on new teachers. She is an elementary school assistant principal.

Timothy Heaphy
Timothy Heaphy

Timothy Heaphy is the principal of Eastridge High School in Irondequoit, NY. Before becoming principal in 2014, he was a social studies teacher for seventeen years, an assistant principal for two years, and a ninth-grade principal for four years. He led a project, funded by the Michael and Susan Dell Foundation, which focused on getting more low income students to enroll and be successful in International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme courses. This sparked many school-wide changes including detracking several courses, building in extension support periods to help students be successful in the more rigorous classes, creating a mentoring pilot, and much more.

Eric Heiser
Eric Heiser

Eric Heiser is an educational consultant, an IB workshop leader and a site visitor. After spending 26 years in leadership positions at four international and American schools abroad in Norway, Japan, Switzerland, and Brazil, he has just concluded twelve years as Executive Director of Sturgis Charter Public School, a nationally and internationally recognized "IB for All" high school with two campuses in Hyannis, MA.

Tammy Kolbe
Tammy Kolbe

Tammy Kolbe is an Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership & Policy Studies at the University of Vermont. She earned an Ed.D. in Educational Leadership & Policy Studies from the University of Vermont and an M.S. in Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation from The Pennsylvania State University. She is committed to developing a better understanding of the types of policies, practices, and resources that promote equal educational opportunities for all students. Most recently, she has examined the differences in instructional quality among schools, the role of cost in promoting or constraining students’ access to college, and the impact of special education funding on students with disabilities’ opportunities to learn. Through her work, she has spent countless hours working with public schools and policymakers on efforts to understand and promote measures that improve the fairness and efficiency with which schools operate.

Ruth M. López
Ruth M. López

Ruth M. López is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Leadership & Policy Studies at the University of Houston. Previously, she was a Senior Research Associate in Research & Policy at the Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University. She also served as a program coordinator at the University of Colorado Boulder for the Colorado Diversity Initiative, where she coordinated a summer undergraduate STEM research program for underrepresented students from all over the country. She earned her PhD in Educational Foundations, Policy, and Practice from the School of Education at the University of Colorado Boulder, where she also received a graduate certificate in Comparative Ethnic Studies. Her research interests include the educational experiences of students of color; the education of undocumented students; and issues of access, equity, and diversity at all levels of education.

Jeff MacSwan
Jeff MacSwan

Jeff MacSwan is a professor in Language, Literacy, and Social Inquiry (LLSI) and in the Program in Neuroscience and Cognitive Science at the University of Maryland. He is affiliated faculty in the University of Maryland Linguistics Department and the Center for the Advanced Study of Language (CASL). He is also editor of the International Multilingual Research Journal, and currently serves on several editorial boards. He is the author of over fifty publications. Examples of his work appear in Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, Lingua, Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, Teachers College Record, Education Policy Analysis Archives, and in edited collections and handbooks. He is a Fellow of the National Education Policy Center (NEPC) and of the American Educational Research Association.

William J. Mathis
William J. Mathis

William J. Mathis is the managing director of NEPC and the former superintendent of schools for the Rutland Northeast Supervisory Union in Brandon, Vermont. He was a National Superintendent of the Year finalist and a Vermont Superintendent of the Year. He currently serves on the Vermont State Board of Education and chairs the legislative committee. He has published or presented research on finance, assessment, accountability, standards, cost-effectiveness, education reform, history, and Constitutional issues. He also serves on various editorial boards and frequently publishes commentary on educational policy issues.

Wagma Mommandi
Wagma Mommandi

Wagma Mommandi is a doctoral student in the School of Education at the University of Colorado Boulder. She is a Graduate Research Assistant for the National Education Policy Center working on a study about charter schools and access. Wagma holds an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from American University and a B.A. in Biology from Colorado College. Prior to graduate school, Wagma was a high school science teacher and coach in the District of Columbia Public Schools. Her research interests lie at the intersection of education policy and critical theories of race.

April L. Peters-Hawkins
April L. Peters-Hawkins

April L. Peters-Hawkins is an Associate Professor at the University of Houston. She earned a Ph.D. in Educational Policy and Leadership from The Ohio State University, an MSW from Teacher’s College, Columbia University in New York and a B.S.Ed. from Northwestern University in Evanston, IL. She has worked as a middle school teacher, a school social worker, Dean of students and a high school principal. She has also served as a consultant for the Institute for Student Achievement (ISA) in the Atlanta Public Schools, where she focused on assisting school leaders and teachers in implementing small school reform model in select high schools. Her research interests include: women in school leadership; examining the ways that districts provide mentoring and support for early career administrators; and leadership and small school reform.

Mary Cathryn Ricker
Mary Cathryn Ricker

Mary Cathryn Ricker is the executive vice president of the American Federation of Teachers. She was elected to that position in July 2014 at the AFT's biennial convention in Los Angeles. Ricker has served as president of the Saint Paul (Minn.) Federation of Teachers since 2005, as an AFT vice president since 2012, and as a member of the AFT K12 Teachers program and policy council since 2006. Ricker has taught in classrooms in Minnesota, Washington and Seoul, South Korea. In addition to being a National Board Certified middle school English teacher, Ricker also serves on the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards board of directors and the Education Minnesota governing board. She is also a past president of the Education Minnesota Foundation for Teaching and Learning.

Kellie Rolstad
Kellie Rolstad

Kellie Rolstad is visiting associate professor of education at the University of Maryland. Her research interests include language education, language diversity, and multilingualism, in addition to more recent work on democratic and alternative education. Rolstad previously served as Associate Professor of Education in the Mary Lou Fulton Institute and Graduate School of Education at Arizona State University. She has served as a visiting scholar in the Graduate School of Education at both Harvard University and UCLA, and has worked as a Spanish-English bilingual kindergarten teacher in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Professor Rolstad holds a Bachelor’s degree in Linguistics, a Master’s degree in Applied Linguistics, and a PhD in Education from UCLA. She has published numerous articles and book chapters; examples of her work appear in Educational Policy, Teachers College Record, Bilingual Research Journal, Bilingual Review, and Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences.

Vincent Romano
Vincent Romano

Vincent Romano is the principal of Malverne High School in Malverne, New York. Romano has served as a teacher, a coach, a chairperson and an assistant principal, as well as an adjunct professor at St. John’s University. He received his doctorate from St. John’s University where he conducted a study on the effectiveness of classroom observation practices for the purpose of instructional improvement. He has been a presenter at many national, state, and local conferences and was the recipient of several awards including the SCOPE Education Award for Exemplary Leadership and Phi Delta Kappa “Friend of Education” Recognition.

Juan Gabriel Sánchez
Juan Gabriel Sánchez

Juan Gabriel Sánchez is currently a doctoral candidate at Boston College. His research interests revolve around teacher education reform, curriculum theory, assessment, and the intersection between democracy and education. Juan Gabriel previously taught at a project- and inquiry-based public high school in Philadelphia, where he learned the affordances of encouraging teachers to take both leadership and inquiry stances. These experiences have also helped him to understand the importance of providing teachers with the opportunities and, importantly, the resources to hone their craft over time. To that end, the work he hopes to do after his program involves working as a teacher educator who empowers educators to learn and advocate for themselves.

Ron Scapp
Ron Scapp

Ron Scapp is the founding director of the Graduate Program of Urban and Multicultural Education at the College of Mount Saint Vincent in the Bronx, NY, where he is also professor of humanities and teacher education. Scapp is also a former president of the National Association for Ethnic Studies (2011-2015) and a current member of the International Committee for Kappa Delta Pi. He has been a longtime fellow at the National Education Policy Center at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Scapp has written and edited numerous books on a variety of topics including popular culture, education, social and political philosophy and art criticism. He was recently a visiting scholar at Teachers College, Columbia University and his new book, Reclaiming Education: Moving Beyond the Culture of Reform, will be published in September 2016.

Janelle Scott
Janelle Scott

Janelle Scott is a Chancellor’s Associate Professor at the University of California at Berkeley in the Graduate School of Education, Goldman School of Public Policy, and African American Studies Department. Her research explores the relationship between education, policy, and equality of opportunity through three policy strands: 1) the racial politics of public education, 2) the politics of school choice, marketization, and privatization, and, 3) the role of elite and community-based advocacy in shaping public education policies and research evidence utilization. She was a Spencer Foundation Dissertation Year Fellow and a National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow. With Co-Principal Investigators Christopher Lubienski and Elizabeth DeBray, and funding from the William T. Grant Foundation, she is currently studying the role of intermediary organizations in research production, promotion, and utilization in the case of incentivist educational reforms.

Gregory Smith
Gregory Smith

Gregory Smith is an emeritus professor of teacher education in the Graduate School of Education and Counseling at Lewis & Clark College, Portland, Oregon. He has been writing and teaching about environmental and sustainability education since the 1980s. His research and publishing efforts have focused on finding ways to strengthen the connections that young people experience with their communities and places. He is the author, coauthor, editor, or coeditor of the following; Reducing the Risk: Schools as Communities of Support (with Wehlage, Rutter, Lesko, and Fernandez; 1989); Education and the Environment: Learning to Live with Limits (1991); Public Schools That Work: Creating Community (1993); Ecological Education in Action: On Weaving Education, Culture, and the Environment (with Williams; 1999); Place-based Education in the Global Age: Local Diversity (with Gruenewald; 2008); Place- and Community-based Education in Schools (with Sobel; 2010).

John Thompson
John Thompson

John Thompson earned a doctorate in U.S. History at Rutgers University. After adversity severely affected his neighborhood in Oklahoma City, he changed from an award-winning Oklahoma historian to an award-winning inner city teacher. Dr. Thompson’s book, A Teacher’s Tale: Learning, Loving and Listening to Our Kids, is a case study of the unintended negative effects of test-driven, competition-driven reform on an inner city high school in the Oklahoma City Public School System.

Peter Tierney
Peter Tierney

Pete Tierney is the founder and, for the last two decades, the lead teacher at Long View High School, a unique, small, familial style school in Jefferson County, Colorado. After graduating from Notre Dame University, he joined the Peace Corps and after his service, he held a variety of teaching, counseling, and supervisory positions, which included starting Colorado’s first youth conservation corps. For 25 years, he oversaw the corps’ growth from its original eight corps members to its current 1600 members. He has spent his entire 49-year career working in personalized educational settings with students who need additional support to achieve their potential.

Avi Tropper
Avi Tropper

Avi Tropper works in education management policy in New York City. Over the past dozen years, he has served as a teacher, dean of students, assistant principal, principal, and education officer. He has also taught graduate courses. Avi has successfully turned around struggling schools by collaborating with fellow educators on instructional and organizational innovations and blending the use of positive psychology within school culture-building. He has participated in the design of multiple innovative new school models expressly created to close the opportunity gap. He opened a high school where all students were intended to participate in the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program. Avi’s writing on education focuses on the use and misuse of data and research in setting policy that leverages education to create greater opportunities for all students.

Tina Trujillo
Tina Trujillo

Tina Trujillo is an associate professor at UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Education and the Faculty Director of UC Berkeley’s Principal Leadership Institute. She earned her Ph.D. in Education from UCLA and her M.A. in Education from the University of Colorado, Boulder. She uses tools from political science and critical policy studies to study the political dimensions of urban district reform, the instructional and democratic consequences of high-stakes testing and accountability policies for students of color and English Language Learners, and trends in urban educational leadership. Her work has been published in a range of journals, including American Educational Research Journal, Teachers College Record, Journal of Educational Administration, and Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis. She is the coeditor of Learning from the Federal Market-Based Reforms: Lessons for the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) (2016, Information Age Publishing, with William Mathis). She is a fellow with NEPC.

Kerri Ullucci
Kerri Ullucci

Kerri Ullucci is an associate professor of urban education at Roger Williams University where she prepares K-12 teachers for urban schools. She received her BA from Carnegie Mellon, her MAT from the University of Pittsburgh and her Ph.D from UCLA. She is a former elementary teacher and in her last classroom position, she taught fourth grade in an urban school. Her research interests include race and poverty issues in schooling and the development of culturally relevant teaching practices. She has been published in several journals, including Urban Education, Race, Ethnicity and Education and Teacher Education Quarterly.

Russ Walsh
Russ Walsh

Russ Walsh is the coordinator of college reading at Rider University in Lawrenceville, NJ. His career in public education spans forty-five years and he has served as a teacher, a literacy specialist, a curriculum supervisor and a college instructor. He has taught at every level of education from kindergarten through graduate school. Russ’ blog, “Russ on Reading”, focuses on public education, literacy instruction and teaching practice. He is also the author of A Parent’s Guide to Public Education in the 21st Century (Garn Press, 2016).

Jennie Whitcomb
Jennie Whitcomb

Jennie Whitcomb is the principal of Sacred Heart Preparatory, a Catholic, independent high school in Northern California. Prior to joining Sacred Heart in 2015, she was the Associate Dean of Teacher Education at CU Boulder (2002-2015) and Director of Teacher Education at the University of Denver (1997-2002). Committed to quality teaching and teacher education, her scholarship has focused on teacher learning and teacher education policy and program design. From 2005-2009 she co-edited the Journal of Teacher Education, and in 2014 she was elected to the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education’s Board. Her turn from university teacher preparation to the daily life of a high school affords her opportunities to live her commitments to quality teaching and to fostering a vibrant, affirming school community focused on delivering powerful learning experiences that guide students to find their purpose and to serve their community.

Ken Zeichner
Ken Zeichner

Ken Zeichner is the Boeing Professor of Teacher Education at the University of Washington, Seattle. He is a former Vice President of the American Educational Research Association, a member of the National Academy of Education and Fellow of the American Educational Research Association and NEPC. He received the Legacy Award by AERA’s Division K and the Lifetime Achievement Award by the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (2009). Ken was a faculty member at the University of Wiscons-Madison from 1976-2009, serving as the Hoefs-Bascom Professor of Teacher Education and as Associate Dean for Teacher Education and International Education. Much of his work in teacher education has involved directing clinical teacher education programs and school university teacher education partnerships. His research focuses on various aspects of teacher education in the U.S. and internationally.